How to Do Your Duty

If you’ve been following my blog, then you’ve spent plenty of time reading about duty. I’ve written a lot about the theory and history of duty, and my last post explained why it’s critical for you to find your life’s purpose and do your duty. But none of that will do you any good unless you know how to do your duty. Today’s post will point you in the right direction.

Step One: Build strength

When it comes to doing your duty, you can’t be hesitant. You need to act with confidence and precision. But before you can do that, you need to know what your purpose is. Otherwise, you’ll feel indecisive and weak—exactly what you don’t want when you’re trying to make an impact in the world. So spend time getting to know yourself better. Once you understand what you were put on this earth to do, it will be easier to focus on the task at hand. Abraham Lincoln once said: “Let us have the faith that might makes right; and in that faith let us, to the end, dare to do our duty as we understand it.” 

Step Two: Build your confidence

Once you’ve found your purpose, you need to learn as much as you can about it. Whether it’s a business idea or a desire to build a family, start by talking to other likeminded people, reading books, listening to audios, and taking courses. Immerse yourself in it. Because the more you understand your goal and everything about it, the more confidence you’ll have when it’s time to do your duty. And that’s important—because confidence drives action.

Seems simple, doesn’t it? That’s because it is. But it doesn’t mean it will be easy. As I wrote in Toughen Up, “We have to strive for it, work for it, and settle for nothing less than real excellence. Never let convenience or any other distractions get in the way. That’s toughness. And it’s our duty.”

Step Three: Build your plan

Imagine that you’re building a new home. But your contractor tells you that since they have the materials and the skills, they don’t need a blueprint. They’ll just design your house as they go. You probably wouldn’t have a lot of confidence in them, would you? After all, building a house without a plan just doesn’t make sense.

It’s the same when it comes to doing your duty. You may have confidence and strength, but without a plan, it’s easy to get confused and make poor choices. Plus, putting a plan on paper makes your life’s purpose real. It will bring you clarity and it will make it easier to gather people who will work with you to achieve your duty.

Why not sit down and write your plan today?

Your Duty Matters

 

On my blog, I write a lot about the concept of duty. I’ve written about why we should do it, I’ve looked at how it’s changed throughout history, and I’ve discussed convenience and excellence—the two major internal cultures that every individual has to choose between. But today, I want to tell you what duty means to me.

When I toughen up, I’m doing my duty. When I choose excellence over convenience, I’m doing my duty. When I’m doing my very best, living my life’s purpose, and achieving my potential, I’m doing my duty. Why? Because we’re all connected, and we all have our jobs to do. Each one of us has something very specific that no one else in the world can do in quite the same way. If we don’t do that task to the best of our ability, if we decide to make excuses when the going gets tough, we let everyone down. As author and pastor Mark Batterson once said, “Uniqueness isn’t a virtue, it’s a responsibility.”

When I was still working as a military diver, it was my buddies’ responsibility to look out for me. And I did the same for them. In the military, the way you do your duty could mean the difference between life and death. Thankfully, they did their duty, and as a result, I’m writing this blog post today.

The story of Paul Kariya’s winning goal in the 2003 Stanley Cup finals is one of my favourite examples of a man who’s done his duty. According to the Calgary Herald, he took a major blow to the head at the hands of Scott Stevens. He was taken off to the dressing room for first aid, and everyone assumed he was out for the game. To the crowd’s astonishment, he came back out onto the ice and scored the winning goal. He did his duty at a time when everyone would have completely understood if he’d decided to bow out.

Now think about your life’s purpose. Are you working towards it? Have you chosen a culture of excellence? Because if you aren’t, the world is missing out on whatever it is you do best. It may not be a matter of life and death (although it’s possible that it is), but it will still make a difference to someone. As I wrote in Toughen Up, “We’re all worse off because some people choose convenience over excellence in their lives. And we’re all better off because some people have chosen to do their best, to live their life purpose to its fullest.” American president Theodore Roosevelt put it like this: “The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, safety first instead of duty first, and love of soft living…”

It’s probably not your life’s duty to score the winning goal in the Stanley Cup finals. But maybe it is. Or maybe it’s your duty to be a patient parent, even when you’re exhausted. Or to build a business that helps others. Whatever your duty is, will you tough it out when you’re on your last legs? I hope so. After all, everyone else is counting on you.

Enjoy your weekend!

Claude

LIFE on LIFE teams up with Literacy Nova Scotia

Hi everyone!

I hope your new year is off to a great start. I know mine is!

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ME WITH JAYNE HUNTER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AT LITERACY NOVA SCOTIA

On Saturday, January 9, the LIFE on LIFE Initiative teamed up with Literacy Nova Scotia to host the inaugural book packing and delivery event. Over 2,000 books were donated by First Book Canada, a nonprofit organization. Through LIFE on LIFE donations and volunteer work, we were able to cover the shipping and delivery costs. Members of both the local and LIFE community came out to help prepare the books for delivery. Books were each labeled with a LNS sticker, and LNS bookmarks and activity books were added to each delivery box. Afterward, fifteen drivers delivered the books to locations across Nova Scotia—from Yarmouth to Cape Breton and everywhere in between! Literacy Nova Scotia shared an awesome video that highlights some key aspects of the event.

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DARREN FISHER, MATT WHITMAN, BILL HORN, DARRELL SAMSON

Journalists and news crews from Global and CBC also showed up. It’s so great to see the public support for such an important cause as it helps to shine a light on the value of family literacy.

Some local politicians attended the event as well: HRM Deputy Mayor Matt Whitman, Councillor in HRM District 13; Darrell Samson, MP Sackville-Preston-Chezzetcook; and Darren Fisher, MP Dartmouth-Cole Harbour all made an appearance. Bill Horne, MLA Waverly-Fall River-Beaverbank, attended as well, representing the province on behalf of the premier;

In addition to the book delivery, over fifty event attendees registered to be members of Literacy Nova Scotia, many of whom also included donations with their membership fees. If you want to become a LNS member, you can sign up here for just five dollars!

I’m so grateful to all who participated in the event, especially the drivers. It couldn’t have happened without your support. I’m so passionate about literacy, and I really believe it begins at home, so I couldn’t be more thrilled with how well Saturday went. This event is just the beginning, and I’m looking forward to a long relationship with Literacy Nova Scotia. Together we can bring change!

Family Literacy Day is January 27, and I can’t wait to celebrate with my boys and some of our favorite books. What do you have planned for Family Literacy Day?

Claude

New Year’s Wisdom From a Six-Year-Old

Hi everyone!

I hope you all had a great Christmas with your family and friends. Another year has already come and gone, and what a great year it was!

Recently my friend Phil Wall shared a video on his Facebook page of his six-year-old daughter, Manaia, talking about how successful babies are! I was so impressed by Manaia’s speech that I’ve shared the video on my YouTube channel for you to watch below.

Manaia is exactly right—adults need to pick themselves up just the way babies do. When they fall—or fail—they need to get right back up, and they, too, can be just as successful. Life, and time, brings with it many changes and bumps along the road, but it’s important we never give up. We all have to embrace our “inner baby” and just keep picking ourselves back up.

It’s amazing how kids pick up on what they see, hear, and are exposed to in the household. Manaia’s evidently been listening to the LIFE Leadership audio CDs!

As we say goodbye to 2015 this week, we should all go into the New Year with Manaia’s attitude, and may 2016 be our most successful yet!

Claude

Supporting Literacy Nova Scotia

Hey everyone!

Recently I shared the amazing news that LIFE Leadership’s LIFE on LIFE initiative is teaming up with Literacy Nova Scotia. This is exciting because it not only allows me to pursue my personal passion for education and literacy, but it is also helping my provincial community, which is incredibly important.

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Presenting Jayne Hunter and Marie David with a cheque for $11,000.

The LIFE on LIFE Initiative takes a portion of the profit from each LIFE subscription. The first organization supported by this initiative, Triangle Literacy, is in North Carolina, where our head office is also located. Since the start, we’ve known we want to branch out our funding, so I’m incredibly excited to announce this partnership with Literacy Nova Scotia. Last week I presented Jayne Hunter and Marie David of Literacy NS with a cheque for $11,000. This money will help provide brand new Disney books to families all across Nova Scotia, just in time for Family Literacy Day on January 27.

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Why is supporting literacy important to you?

It’s been great to see everyone’s support across social media thus far. The first week of November marked Literacy Action Week, and my newsfeed was filled with your selfies telling me why literacy matters to you. I compiled all the #LAW2015 photos and shared them on Flickr, so if you missed the posts, be sure to check it out!

As time goes on, there will be more ways to get involved with Literacy Nova Scotia, including donation and volunteer opportunities. In the meantime, you can follow Literacy NS on Twitter and like their account on Facebook for updates. You can also become a Literacy NS member for just five dollars! Members are able to vote at the Literacy NS Annual General Meeting, and your voice adds to the advancement of all levels of adult literacy in NS.

I’ll continue to share updates on my Facebook and Twitter as this partnership continues!

Share in the comments below why literacy matters to you!

Have a great week!

Claude Hamilton

LIFE on LIFE supports Literacy Nova Scotia

Hi everyone!
On Monday, the LIFE Leadership blog shared an exciting post announcing the recent donation we made to Literacy Nova Scotia. On November 23, I was able to present Jayne Hunter and Marie David of Literacy NS with a cheque for $11,000! It was such a great feeling to know that the money from the LIFE on LIFE Initiative is being put toward such a great cause. Literacy NS is a powerful organization and I’m confident the money we have donated, and continue to donate, will be used to have a positive impact on our local community.
You can read the original post below.
Thanks!
Claude

Life Leadership Makes Large Contribution to Literacy Nova Scotia

BY

“Literacy is one of the greatest gifts a person can receive.” – Jen Selinsky

Life Leadership‘s Life on Life Initiative has inspired thousands of people to give back to organizations that support underprivileged and disenfranchised members of society. Life Leadership Members have been getting involved in unique and creative ways, some through community service outreach programs and others by organizing events that provide necessities such as food, clothing and hygiene items. As part of Life Leadership’s corporate Life on Life Initiative, CEO Chris Brady announced that the company would be contributing funds on a monthly basis to qualifying literacy centers in the company’s various markets at the rate of $1 donated for each Life Leadership subscription.

In August of 2015, Chris Brady and COO Rob Hallstrand presented the first check totaling over $11,000 to the Triangle Literacy Council in Raleigh, North Carolina. Since then, several other literacy programs have benefited financially from these corporate contributions. In fact, this literacy initiative even inspired Life Leadership co-founder, Claude Hamilton, to get involved.

Life Leadership Corporate

Hamilton stated recently that he is so passionate about literacy that he has decided to personally contribute time, money and influence to support the cause. That’s when he sought out Literacy Nova Scotia – a non-profit charitable organization that provides services to ensure that all Nova Scotians have equal access to quality literacy, essential skills and lifelong learning opportunities.

During the first week of November, Hamilton and several of his teammates participated in Literacy Action Week in order to help raise awareness on the importance of literacy.

In working closely with Literacy Nova Scotia, Hamilton realized how much good they were doing to support and promote literacy that on November 23rd, 2015, he presented the first check to the organization – totaling $11,000. This donation was just a portion of the funds provided by Life Leadership as part of the company’s corporate Life on Life Initiative.

“Life Leadership is delighted to be able to provide funding to the very important fight to improve literacy in Canada. We are honored to be able to contribute and hope this is only the beginning of a huge difference we can make together!” – Chris Brady

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Claude Hamilton presenting the first donation to Marie David and Jayne Hunter of Literacy Nova Scotia

Check out this highlight video of the partnership between Life Leadership and Literacy Nova Scotia:

Life Leadership has already poured tens of thousands of dollars into various literacy programs for its Life on Life Initiative; however, what’s even more exciting is the ripple effect that is already being felt all over North America. We are so thankful for the leadership of co-founder, Claude Hamilton, for actively carrying the torch to improve literacy in Nova Scotia in order to make an even bigger difference for those who need help functioning in society.

Why is literacy important to you? Please be sure to leave a comment below!

“Robbed” – Claude Hamilton

Hey everyone,

We recently held a few LIFE leadership conventions across the country. When I was speaking in Springfield, MA., I read the poem “Robbed.” I’ve had quite a few requests to share the poem online, so I’ve decided to post it on my blog for those of you who may have missed the convention, and for those who just want another look.

The poem has such an important message about how dangerous nay-sayers can be. It’s not the physical threats that pose a risk to us, but instead those who threaten our emotional well-being and our drive to work toward a better future.

Do you relate to this poem? Don’t forget to leave your comments below.

Remember, it can be done.

Claude Hamilton

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“Robbed” – Author Unknown

 

Supporting Literacy with LIFE on LIFE

Hi everyone!

Many of you have heard of the LIFE on LIFE initiative we have launched at the LIFE corp. I’m very excited about this and wanted to give you some insight on how I’m working it into my life. In 2007, when I became business partners with Orrin Woodward and Chris Brady I learned they had a charitable foundation called All Grace Outreach.

All Grace Outreach is a Christian charitable organization committed to helping those in need. Its main focus is spreading the gospel throughout the world, and helping abused, abandoned, and distressed children and widows.

When I first began donating, I did it in small amounts. At first, I just gave on Sunday mornings at the denominational services we have at our Leadership Conventions. As time went on, I became increasingly interested in giving and serving more. As I learned more about Orrin and Chris, I continued to believe in who they were and what they believed.

A few years ago, I was asked to sit on the board at AGO and take some responsibility for dispersing funds. I take this obligation seriously and am diligent about who I give money to. Recently the AGO board members realized that the AGO could do more and serve more if it had someone to drive it forward. At the time we were coming to this realization, Chris Swanson popped up. I will do another blog post just on Chris in the next few days, but in short, he is amazing and will do amazing things for AGO. I feel great being apart of the AGO and hope to continue to be allowed to serve on its board.

Over the years, I have given money to many different causes, with no rhyme or reason. Sometimes the right person asked, and other times my heart was feeling generous, whether it was sponsoring local hockey teams or slipping some cash to a teenage couple that was surprised with the news they were pregnant. Sometimes it was faith-based, like local churches or mission trips and sometimes it wasn’t faith based at all, like kids showing up at my door to be sponsored or to sell apples or cookies. I have a rule of thumb, if a kid knocks at my door, I buy everything they are selling!

As I sit here and write this, I’m actually remembering all the places people or causes I have given money to, and in a selfish prideful moment, I’m feeling kind of proud of it. I have never actually sat down and made a list or tried to remember them all, but as I sit here now and make a mental list, I am mildly impressed with myself. That said, I wasn’t very organized in how I gave—I just gave.

I also really developed a preference for giving anonymously. I don’t know why I took a fondness to it so much. It just feels great giving and not expecting any glory or anything in return. The second best is giving and only you and the people you’re giving to know. I like the feeling I get when I give and very few people know. It’s almost like its proof that I’m doing it for the right reasons. I’m in no way trying to highlight my charitable history, but instead am trying to outline how I’ve given in the past—with no real direction.

Every year, my wife, Lana, likes to participate in an Angel Tree program. The Angel Tree program is run across the globe, with many different local sponsors. Its aim is to supply gifts and food bank supplies to children and adults during the holiday season. When you select an “angel,” you are given the age and gender of the child or adult you have chosen to shop for, so you can try to make the gift as personal as possible. The Enfield Angel Tree Food Bank runs an Angel Tree program, if you’re in the Nova Scotia area in looking to find out more. 

Lana’s contribution to the Angel Tree program started when we were incredibly broke. We didn’t buy gifts for each other for many years, but she would take a couple of the Angel Tree angels and buy gifts for a few kids. It started with one, then a few, and I think this year she will do over one hundred children. She makes it a lot of fun and takes some of our friends along with her. They’re all so excited to buy gifts for children that they will never meet.

I envied the simplicity and impact of her effort, and I tried to do a few things like it. I wanted to buy turkeys and give them to families in need during the holidays, but you wouldn’t believe the red tape involved in that. Next, I decided I would roam the supermarkets the weeks before Christmas and buy groceries for people when they approached the till. (I was asked to leave a few stores.) Last year, while I was driving with Wyatt to buy gifts for his Mom, I saw people on the sidewalks asking for spare change. I looked at Wyatt and started pulling up beside anyone I saw begging and gave them each a 50-dollar bill. It was a rush, but I saw many leave their corner almost immediately. Hopefully they went for a meal or warmer clothing, but I suspect some of them went to buy drugs or alcohol.

Essentially, I haven’t been that organized when giving money away. I thought about starting my own charitable organization like my friend Tim Marks did in Haiti, but it seemed like a lot of work that someone could de better and more efficiently then I could. Plus, though Tim handles his charity with class and no ego and its his personal passion, I saw many other people who were seeking glory more for themselves than to really make a difference; I didn’t want that accusation ever leveled at me.

With AGO, I feel like I am doing the Lord’s work. That said, I feel as I’ve been blessed so much that I still have more privilege to give. My sons are two and four, and they will grow up with a blessed life, but I want to teach them to work, not to earn, but to work to learn and to work to serve.

By setting this as an example, and by serving others, it teaches the principles I want them to learn. The only problem was, though I knew I wanted to serve and contribute, I didn’t yet have a cause that stirred my soul.

I sit in my office, surrounded by all the books I have read. I don’t like putting books on my shelf I haven’t read. So if you see it on my shelf, I have read that book. I humbly acknowledge the impact that associating myself with all these magnificent authors has had on me. I know that I get to live the lifestyle I have today, and provide for my family the way I can because of what I have learned reading over the years.

I always believed that a man who can read and doesn’t is as disadvantaged as the man who cannot read. With that thought, my heart began to stir and I realized I had found a cause I could pour my heart and soul (and effort and money) into.

I quickly called Chris and Orrin and began asking them questions about how to go about chasing this new dream. To my surprise, the same thoughts had been brewing in their minds. LIFE helps a small hard working group of focused people create financial freedom. We help the majority of people get debt free and lead better lives, but we were missing the disenfranchised and disadvantaged. After discussing this, the founders decided the literacy cause lined up with our core values and also was in line with what we do at LIFE. We want to give back in the markets we operate in, not just with AGO, but also in a way that helped anyone from any belief system, race, ethnic group, etc.

We started taking a portion of the profit from each LIFE subscription and putting it towards supporting LIFE on LIFE. The first organization we supported was in North Carolina where our head office is located. Now we are ready to branch out.

I am excited to support this as a LIFE founder, of course. I’m ready to collaborate with organizations and utilize LIFE resources to serve and make the biggest impact possible. I am also excited to personally contribute my time, money, and influence to support this cause.

In the Nova Scotia area, we are thrilled to announce that we’ll be contributing and supporting Literacy Nova Scotia.

The goal of Literacy Nova Scotia is to “work to ensure that all Nova Scotians have equal access to quality literacy, essential skills, and lifelong learning opportunities.”

Literacy Nova Scotia has a respect for all its members of learning communities. They are actively moving forward to help these learners reach their goals and fulfill their potential. They’re ready to help all learners, and they respect individuality, culture, and diversity.

They’re responsible with their funds, and I feel confident that by donating to Literacy Nova Scotia, we can help to make a difference in our local area.

This week, November 1-7, is Literacy Action Week. During this week, there are information sessions and other activities held across NS. In addition, literacy-related meetings are held with government officials. The goal of this week is to share information and support adult literacy across our province and local communities.

CTDwTThUkAA8d8bYou can find out more information about Literacy Action Week on Literacy Nova Scotia’s website.

In addition, you can contribute to Literacy Action Week’s social media awareness by posting a selfie with the Literacy Action Week poster.

Don’t forget to use the hashtag #LIFEonLIFE, #LiteracyChangesLives, and #LAW2015 so that we can see your pictures! You can tag me on Twitter and Facebook, and be sure to tag and follow Literacy Nova Scotia, as well.

I’ll be posting another blog in the coming days, which will give you more information on Literacy Nova Scotia and the awesome impact they’ve had in NS.

Claude

Spending Time With My Boys

Hey everyone!

Many of you have seen these pictures of me 12115617_555886764560404_2076992576810776200_nskating 12118677_555886737893740_4679928493864393510_nwith the boys the other day. We plan to go to the arena as often as possible this winter. Both boys seem to like skating so far!

This summer we focused on swimming and biking. Both boys can swim well, going underwater and in the deep end. It’s funny and a bit unnerving to watch a 22-month-old jump off a diving board, into the water, and swim to the side of the pool.

We try to go four to five times a week, so they have been able to pick up quickly. The boys also really enjoyed riding their bikes at the skate park this summer. They became quite amazing on their bikes. Once again, watching a 22-month-old, still in diapers, drop into a half pipe is nerve-wracking for the parents!! Both boys wracked up some spectacular crashes, but the only injuries were a few cuts and bruises.

As a father, I am so blessed to be able to spend this time nurturing a love for physical activity in the boys. Here are some videos of our fun-filled summer days. Some were taken with my beloved Blackberry so the quality is not that great.  Enjoy!

Jumping off the counter: This first video is not biking or swimming, but I love it because it shows the boys’ little boy spirit. I was sitting at the kitchen table reading and Wyatt was in the hearth room. When I looked up, he was jumping off the counter onto the couch. He didn’t know anyone was watching; he just thought it would be fun. Jumping off the counters is not allowed (often) at our house, but he did get a few leaps in before I stopped him!


This is a video of the dirt park, as the boys call it. The video doesn’t do the hill’s steepness or Gryffin’s speed justice. They love the dirt park because it’s often wet and muddy.


The next three videos are at the Fall River skate park. You might notice they are in pajamas in some of these videos. We usually go to the skate park in the morning and the swimming pool in the afternoon.


The next three videos are at the Halifax Commons skate park. In the first video, you can see Gryffin comes close to colliding with Wyatt. This happened more times then you can count. A huge skate park and still they were able to find each other and collide!!

I hope you all had a great summer, as well! We’re looking forward to many days spent at the rink and in the snow this winter!

Claude

Getting to Know JL and Nicole Pellerin

Hey everyone!

Today on the blog we have a profile of JL and Nicole Pellerin.

JL and Nicole are such amazing people to have as friends. They’re so much fun, and some of Lana and I’s greatest and most fun adventures have included the Pellerins.

The first time I met JL, he was the sharpest dressed guy in the room. I was there to show him an opportunity, and he came dressed better than me!

I look forward to a long (and fun) life of hanging out with this awesome couple!

Claude

Getting to Know Kaizen Leaders: JL and Nicole Pellerin, as written by Bethany Sampson

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JL AND NICOLE PELLERIN

Rock and Roll.

It’s not just a team name for JL and Nicole Pellerin; it’s a way of life, and everything they do revolves around this expression.

The phrase originates from the seventeenth century when ships would rock and roll due to the motions of the sea. As a metaphor for the Pellerin’s action-packed lives, the expression is more relevant than ever.

“You can go through life on auto-pilot, if you want,” says JL, “but I’d rather be out there in the seas where the action is happening.”

“You can’t stay secure, docked, and calm on the shore,” Nicole agrees. At least, not if you want to experience the good stuff.

JL and Nicole Pellerin are high school sweethearts. They’ve been married for seventeen years, and dated for nearly another ten years before that. Over the last quarter century, the Pellerin ship has rocked and rolled over many different seas.

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Ten years ago, Nicole Pellerin had just closed down her retail shop. She’d gone to school at the University of Moncton, and had an interest in entrepreneurship, but after the closing of her store, she wasn’t necessarily looking for a business venture.

JL also worked in business. He, too, had obtained a degree from the University of Moncton, and with his marketing background, he pursued a job in sales. He ended up working as the national sales manager for a provincial newspaper, a job he still maintains to this day.

The couple, content in their life, wasn’t looking for any new opportunities. A close friend, however, introduced the couple to the business, and the opportunity came knocking anyway.

unnamed-7Initially, the couple declined the business venture. At the time, Nicole was pregnant with the couple’s youngest child, and felt they had no time to spare.

The Pellerin’s friend was able to convince them to attend an Open. It was there that the couple met the Dionnes and the Hamiltons. It was also at this Open that they were first able to see “the big picture.”

unnamed-3That said, the couple still maintained that they were too busy to explore this new avenue. When their friend asked, “Are you doing anything now that’s going to change [the business]?” the couple realized that they, indeed, were not.

Their schedules were packed with work, family, commitments, and life. For the Pellerins, they thought the solution to their over-packed lives was to try harder, and to plan smarter.

That solution, however, was not working.

That night at the Open, on a whim—and with the intentions of gaining more time—the couple said, “Let’s give this a shot!

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THE PELLERIN FAMILY

Flash forward one year, and the couple was able to fully replace Nicole’s income, allowing her to fulfill her goal of being a stay-at-home mom to the couple’s two children, Nicolas, 12, and Jacob, 10. The couple hopes JL will soon be able to join Nicole as a stay-at-home parent.

The Pellerins relish in the amount of time they’re able to spend together. The flexibility in Nicole’s schedule means the kids can go home everyday after school, as opposed to attending an after-school program. In addition, the couple schedules in weekly family nights, date nights, and nights dedicated to “helping [their] friends win” in business.

LIFE Leadership’s content has allowed JL and Nicole to better understand each other, and their children.

Understanding each other’s love language, has allowed them to improve their connection, to understand and appreciate each other’s strengths, and to recognize their weaknesses.

Having been together since their teenage years, the couple has learned to grow and adapt together.

“People don’t always change at the same rhythm,” says Nicole. She emphasizes the importance of both understanding and respecting the other person, even if you don’t necessarily agree on everything. Ultimately, she and JL are two different people with two different personalities, and it was important for the two of them to learn that that is okay. Gaining this knowledge has helped the couple to be—and remain—strong, both individually and together.

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A FAMILY ADVENTURE

This knowledge of personality types has also helped the couple with their parenting. Their first child, Nicholas, was a sanguine, easygoing child, which made the parenting easy as well. Their second child, Jacob, had a choleric, go-getting personality. JL and Nicole read many books, which aided them in parenting different personalities, as well as informing them of the different love languages and the different needs of each child.

“We love them the same way,” says Nicole, “but you can’t necessarily parent the same way.”

The parenting techniques the Pellerins have brought to the family have made their way into the community. JL coaches the boys’ hockey and baseball teams, and tries hard to constantly encourage the players. He has learned—through his own experience with Joce, Claude, and Orrin—the importance of positive encouragement, and he tries to pass that onto his sons and his sons’ teammates.

“When you give them the smallest bit of encouragement, they just flourish,” says JL.

The business environment has been a backdrop for nearly all of the kids’ lives, and they have been—and continue to be—shaped by the positivity of the business, the material they hear on the CDs, and by witnessing their parents run for goals. JL and Nicole admit to both missing and hitting some goals, but the lesson is still clear: it’s important to set goals, no matter the outcome.

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LIFE Leadership has provided the couple with so much more than just a business. They have time, community, friendship, and notably, the chance to help others take the same chance they once did.

“Go on faith,” says Nicole. “This business can offer you whatever you’re look for. Not everybody’s looking for money, but everybody’s looking for something.”

She encourages people to find the dream inside of them, whether it’s for time, money, vacation, or the chance to volunteer, and pursue it.

Despite the successes they’ve achieved, JL and Nicole are still dreaming. LIFE Coach is a long-term goal, building an in-law suite for Nicole’s parents is what they’re hoping to do in the short-term. The couple is confident these are goals they can hit.

unnamed-8“I can’t see us not having this in our lives,” says JL. “The whole business has brought excitement, effectiveness, and betterment to everything that we do.”

“It’s a way of life,” says Nicole. “It’s who we are.”

“We were just a regular small-town Acadian family,” says JL, “and we had the guts to say, ‘Yeah, let’s do it.’”

The risk, it appears, has paid off.

Do you know JL and Nicole? Leave your comments on the couple below!